Wednesday, April 24, 2013

Uses Of Portable Oxygen Concentrator

Portable oxygen like simplygo, eaypulse, Airsep Freestyle are used by people when they're not getting enough oxygen into their lungs due to illness or other health reasons. The oxygen that comes from an oxygen tank is concentrated and will help increase oxygen levels in the blood quickly and effectively. The amount of oxygen used, and the frequency of usage, should be determined by your physician.

Oxygen is used as a medical treatment in both chronic and acute cases, and can be used in hospital, pre-hospital or entirely out of hospital, dependant on the needs of the patient and their medical professionals' opinions.


Use in chronic conditions
A common use of supplementary oxygen is in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD),the occurrence of chronic bronchitis or emphysema, a common long term effect of smoking, who may require additional oxygen to breathe either during a temporary worsening of their condition, or throughout the day and night. It is indicated in COPD patients with PaO2 ≤ 55mmHg or SaO2 ≤ 88% and has been shown to increase lifespan.

Oxygen is often prescribed for people with breathlessness, in the setting of end-stage cardiac or respiratory failure, advanced cancer or neurodegenerative disease, despite having relatively normal blood oxygen levels. A 2010 trial of 239 subjects found no significant difference in reducing breathlessness between oxygen and air delivered in the same way.

Use in acute conditions
Oxygen is widely used in emergency medicine, both in hospital and by emergency medical services or advanced first aiders.

In the pre-hospital environment, high flow oxygen is definitively indicated for use in resuscitation, major trauma, anaphylaxis, major haemorrhage, shock, active convulsions and hypothermia.

It may also be indicated for any other patient where their injury or illness has caused hypoxaemia, although in this case oxygen flow should be moderated to achieve target oxygen saturation levels, based on pulse oximetry (with a target level of 94–98% in most patients, or 88–92% in COPD patients).

For personal use, high concentration oxygen is used as home therapy to abort cluster headache attacks, due to its vaso-constrictive effects.


Many patients require only a supplementary level of oxygen in the room air they are breathing, rather than pure or near pure oxygen,[9] and this can be delivered through a number of devices dependant on the situation, flow required and in some instances patient preference.

A nasal cannula (NC) is a thin tube with two small nozzles that protrude into the patient's nostrils. It can only comfortably provide oxygen at low flow rates, 2–6 litres per minute (LPM), delivering a concentration of 24–40%.

There are also a number of face mask options, such as the simple face mask, often used at between 6 and 12 LPM, with a concentration of oxygen to the patient of between 28% and 50%. This is closely related to the more controlled air-entrainment masks, also known as Venturi masks, which can accurately deliver a predetermined oxygen concentration to the trachea up to 40%.

In some instances, a partial rebreathing mask can be used, which is based on a simple mask, but featuring a reservoir bag, which increases the provided oxygen rate to 40–70% oxygen at 5 to 15 LPM.

Non-rebreather masks draw oxygen from an attached reservoir bags, with one-way valves that direct exhaled air out of the mask. When properly fitted and used at flow rates of 10-15 LPM or higher, they deliver close to 100% oxygen. This type of mask is indicated for acute medical emergencies.

ShareThis