Thursday, June 12, 2014

Insomnia found to increase the risk of stroke

According to Jo White of http://www.sleepio.com/blog/ there is a recent study on journal Stroke Ming-Ping Wu and colleagues conducted a four-year prospective study examining whether insomnia acts as a risk factor for developing stroke, and whether persistent insomnia increases this risk. This is true if you conducted a research about the topic and I found out that insomnia can really be associated with stroke.



We know that poor sleep has been linked to cardiovascular diseases. But there have been few studies that have investigated the relationship between insomnia and cardiovascular disease outcomes such as the risk for stroke. One of the areas that is yet to be fully examined is whether insomnia precedes and acts as a risk factor for the future onset of stroke.

In a recent study, published online in the journal Stroke, Ming-Ping Wu and colleagues conducted a four-year prospective study examining whether insomnia acts as a risk factor for developing stroke, and whether persistent insomnia increases this risk. Approximately 85,000 adults were assessed as part of the Taiwan Longitudinal Health Insurance Database.

From this group, over twenty thousand met the criteria for developing insomnia since the start of the study. Persistent insomnia was defined as consistent insomnia diagnosis at each 180-day period across the four-year interval; relapse of insomnia was defined as a return of insomnia after being diagnosed free of the condition for more than180 days; and finally, insomnia remission was defined as transitioning to a non-insomnia diagnosis and remaining this way for remainder of the evaluation period. Hospitalisation for stroke (and type of stroke) was recorded as the main dependent variable, and according to diagnostic codes from the International Classification of Diseases.

Risk of stroke was found to be significantly higher in patients with insomnia – with those in the insomnia group nearly 85% more likely to have been hospitalised for stroke in the four-year follow-up period. This increased risk was particularly pronounced for transient ischemic attack or ‘mini-stroke’. After adjustment for potential confounding variables (such as physical and mental health conditions, as well as age, sex and socioeconomic status), those with insomnia still had a 54% increased risk of stroke relative to those without insomnia. Interestingly, those with a persistent pattern of insomnia also had a significantly higher cumulative incident rate of stroke, relative to those who initially experienced insomnia but subsequently went into remission. Thus the severity and patterning of insomnia may play a role in stroke risk.

The research team conclude:

“Our study provides population-based evidence that people with insomnia have higher incidences and risks of hospitalization for stroke as compared with noninsomniacs. The results of this study suggest that intervention to improve insomnia is needed and should be examined whether it could be a strategy to improve cardiovascular health.”

According to research and study this may lead not only stroke but different kinds of sleep problems. If you are aware of the sleep disorders you may take this thing seriously. To avoid such problems we provided more readings and information for preventing insomnia and also provide some ideas on how to treat insomnia. Learn insomnia's symptoms, treatment and possible prevention's. 

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